Investigative journalist says NYC paid Al Qaeda terror state to rent hotel rooms to migrants invading the Big Apple

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9/10/2020 - it was a pouring day by Jeffrey Blum is licensed under Unsplash unsplash.com
NEW YORK CITY, NY – Daniel Greenfield, an investigative journalist with a focus on the radical left and Islamic terrorism, wrote an op-ed about how the Big Apple allegedly paid Al Qaeda terror state $200 million to rent hotel rooms to illegal immigrants.

The Roosevelt Hotel, a luxurious hotel in midtown Manhattan, now has busloads of illegal immigrants being dropped off in front of its doors, and according to Greenfield, 41 of those migrants who are actually living in the hotel have been arrested for beating wives, girlfriends and significant others.

There have also been assaults on employees of the hotel and one arrest for child endangerment.

According to Greenfield, Mayor Eric Adams and the city of New York leased the Roosevelt Hotel from Pakistan for $220 million. “That amounts to paying $210 per room for each night that an illegal alien invader uses it to smoke meth or abuse their wives and daughters,” Greenfield said.

He added, “In a city where a quarter of young children live in poverty, that $220 million could probably be put to better use than paying the Islamic terror state linked to the September 11 attacks on New York City for the privilege of housing the hordes of invaders in ‘contemporary luxury.’”

Greenfield describes how the once luxurious hotel, which was the setting for movies like Wall Street and The French Connection, has now been invaded by foreigners who have turned it into “a drug den.” He wrote, “Inside the Roosevelt from the gilt sign at the entrance to the art deco halls has been tarnished. Migrants squat under the massive crystal chandelier in the ballroom and sleep on the red carpet.

“Despite supposedly being poor and desperate, many are swiping and clicking through their smartphone apps while they wait for their next taxpayer-funded benefit to arrive.”

Local businesses, many of which were hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, are now struggling through the migrant crisis that is plaguing New York City.

Greenfield wrote, “The cost of housing the invaders is being paid to the Pakistani government even though Pakistan International Airlines, under the control of the terror state’s government, was barred from flying directly to the United States after 9/11, it was allowed to take over the hotel and run it into the ground. The Biden administration has since allowed PIA to resume direct flights.

“Now, New Yorkers are stuck paying hundreds of millions of dollars to an Islamic terror state tied to the attacks that killed so many fellow residents and citizens to provide luxury housing for the latest wave of invaders. Osama bin Laden would be proud of what is happening here.”

Greenfield stated that Pakistan is not the only foreign business benefiting from the migrant crisis in New York City. “Chinese developer Jubo Xie, who put up the world’s tallest Holiday Inn in Manhattan, got $190 a night, $93,000 a day and $2.8 million a month to house the invaders," he wrote.

"The skyscraper hotel, a bafflingly ugly eyesore, was in trouble before the migrant bailout was approved by a bankruptcy judge. A number of other foreign owned hotels are also benefiting from the arrangement.”

Foreign countries and America’s enemies are certainly profiting from the migrant crisis in the Big Apple, but as Greenfield notes, “we are doing this to ourselves.”

Between the open borders and “right to shelter” regulations, these individuals are guaranteed a room regardless of how “illegal, violent or diseased they may be.” As Greenfield noted, “The taxpayers will pay for it and hand over the cash to Pakistan to finance more terrorism.”
 
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